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Museo Atlantico is an Underwater Museum You Must See to Believe

Underwater related adventures are very much an interconnected and integral part of the travel, resort and hospitality industries. If you have never gone scuba diving or snorkeled before in your life, which only involves going down less than 100 feet below the water surface, then you are missing out on a surreal and unforgettable perspective of the world. Even if scuba diving is old hat to you, then you still have never had an experience like the one waiting for underwater explorers about 50 feet below the coastal waters of Lanzarote, which is one of the Canary Islands and a territory of Spain.

Museo Atlántico is the world’s first underwater museum experience located under the waters of the Atlantic Ocean.

Visit time limited to Amount of Life-sustaining Air left

This is the only museum in the entire world where your visitation time can only be limited by the amount of life-sustaining air that is available in your oxygen tanks. About 400 life-like sculptures were submerged into the ocean floor off the Lanzarote coast by renowned British avant-garde Jason deCaires Taylor. His sculptures are made with a custom formula cement mixture that allows the underwater artwork to also act as natural coral reefs for marine life and fish. This way, the underwater museum could also benefit marine life as well as inquisitive human divers.

Taylor is an expert scuba diver, an advocate for the protection of marine habitats and a natural philosopher. He created the Museo Atlántico and his underwater sculptures to publicly express in Taylor’s words, “tales of the world, reflections of climate change and habitat loss based on real-life characters, their stories and relationships with the environment.” Scuba or snorkel enabled visitors to this surreal world will find an assortment of underwater exhibits to check out. “The Rubicon,” is an installation of 35 sculptures, posed like a scene from a midday street in a major city except for underwater, walking towards a gate.

The Exhibition Under Water

Resting 50 feet under the waters of the Lanzarote coast are sculptures watching TV while relaxing on a couch, riding a bike, scrambling to get off a raft, tending bar and taking selfies, to name a few.

Most amazingly, this is not the world’s first underwater museum, only the world’s first underwater museum in the Atlantic Ocean. Taylor opened his first underwater art exhibition in 2006 off the coast of Grenada in the West Indies. Taylor’s first underwater exhibition in Grenada was listed as one of National Geographic’s 25 Wonders of the World. Taylor also co-founded and opened the Museo Subacuatico de Arte, a 500-strong submerged sculpture exhibition, off of the coast of Cancun, Mexico in 2009. The Museo Atlántico is only Taylor’s latest work on submerged artwork.

As a sweetener to attract patrons, Lanzarote officials have announced that 2 percent of all revenue from Museo Atlántico will be used for research and conservation efforts to protect the marine life and coral reefs around the island. If you love scuba diving, snorkeling, or have never tried it before, then this is a great way to start the practice.

Learn Scuba to Reach the Temple

In fact, the only way to visit one of Taylor’s submerged art installations is through taking scuba lessons and/or renting equipment from a certified scuba diving company. Taylor works in concert with scuba companies to entice more visitors to take up scuba diving and snorkeling. So, what are you waiting for? If you have never been scuba diving before or snorkeled off of a coastline, then there is an aspect of leisure travel that you have never experienced before. And you are missing out on exploring some otherworldly sights, like Taylor’s surreal underwater exhibitions. What is a travel experience if you don’t explore every possible opportunity available to you?  To learn more, schedule a visit to Museo Atlántico or to inquire about rates, email - museoatlantico@centrosturisticos.com.

 

 

 

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